An Upgraded Version of the Classic Bell-Shaped Shelter

SHARING IS CARING!
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Assimilating New-Age Technology into an 80-year-old Ingenuity and Vision

 

The design of ‘Bivak II na Jezerih’ was driven from the original bell-shaped alpine shelter designed by engineer Karlo Korenini 80 years ago, but with better interior finishes, refined details and significant advancement to its construction.

The erection of the original bivouac was extremely laborious; it took days for climbers to manually transport more than a ton of steel and wood to the Julian Alps as there were no access roads back in 1936. Thanks to the availability of new building materials and technology, the new improved structure was airlifted to site by a helicopter and took only 600 hours to construct.

For it to be airlifted, the finished bivouac has to weigh less than 1300 kg. Aluminium was chosen as the main cladding material for the enclosure as it is lightweight, high-strength, and its subdued grey tone complements seamlessly with the alpine hues. It is also easily malleable and extremely durable.

To gear up against probable harsh weather conditions and remoteness of the area, the new functional shelter is built to withstand wind speed of up to 200 mph and requires almost no maintenance. Located in Slovenia’s Triglav National Park, it replaces the original bivouac as an outpost for exploring the region. With just 9 sq.m of usable space, the shelter is basic with things like a bench, a folding table, and a simple storage container that doubles up as seating space, accommodating up to 6 persons.

Take a look through these images and tell us what you think on our Facebook page!

 

Dobro jutro Slovenija! // Good morning Slovenia // Foto: Anže Čokl, anzecokl.com

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Helikopterski prevoz bivaka z doline Vrata // Helicopter air-lifts bivouac from valley Vrata

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Pogled za bogove na Triglav. God's view from the bivouac to the north face of Triglav, Slovenia's highest mountain. Foto: Anže Čokl, anzecokl.com

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